Want to contribute to Japan disaster relief? Here’s how…

Amidst managing and posting all the incoming information on the tragic earthquakes and tsunami that beset Japan late last week, we buried information on how and where to help with your donations in a link in the 11th paragraph of our Saturday 12 March story. In retrospect, this was a dumb decision that simply did not give this valuable information the prominence it deserves.

The previously-linked Lazacode.com story by Lili Ladaga cites eight organizations that are working on relief and recovery in the region:

AMERICAN RED CROSS: Emergency Operation Centers are opened in the affected areas and staffed by the chapters. This kind of disaster is even more than the Japanese Red Cross is equipped to handle. Your donation will go to the American Red Cross, which will go into a fund for International Disaster Relief, which is then deployed to the region to help. Donate here.

GLOBALGIVING: Established a fund to disburse donations to organizations providing relief and emergency services to victims of the earthquake and tsunami. Donate here.

SAVE THE CHILDREN: Mobilizing to provide immediate humanitarian relief in the shape of emergency health care and provision of non-food items and shelter. Donate here.

SALVATION ARMY: The Salvation Army has been in Japan since 1895 and is currently providing emergency assistance to those in need. Donate here.

AMERICARES: Emergency team is on full alert, mobilizing resources and dispatching an emergency response manager to the region. Donate here.

CONVOY OF HOPE: Disaster Response team established connection with in-country partners who have been impacted by the damage and are identifying the needs and areas where Convoy of Hope may be of the greatest assistance. Donate here.

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL CORPS: Putting together relief teams, as well as supplies, and are in contact with partners in Japan and other affected countries to assess needs and coordinate our activities. Donate here.

SHELTER BOX: The first team is mobilizing to head to Japan and begin the response effort. Donate here.

For those seeking a broader-based menu of donation organizations, faith-based Christian, Jewish and Buddhist groups are among the 28 donation options (some of which are duplicated from the 8 listed above) on the InterAction website, whose sheer volume of information is best seen via clicking this link.

Finally, some practical advice and further tips comes to us from one of our best sources: The Truth About Cars‘ Bertel Schmitt, whose How To REALLY Help People In Need In Japan article is reproduced below:

Many friends asked us what they can do to help the people in Japan. After many emails and Skype calls with family and friends, here are Don’ts and Dos of helping.

Please don’t send blankets, medicine, etc. If you send stuff, it will not get delivered.

The biggest problem is getting things through. This problem will increase. Supermarket shelves even in downtown Tokyo are bare. No rice, no milk, no pasta. Two reasons: People stocked up. And the distribution system broke down. Roads and ports of the world’s largest importer of agricultural products are closed.

The situation in outlying areas is worse. The logistical problems in a densely populated country with most road and rail by the sea will be staggering.

Please do send money. Pretty much the only thing that works is the Internet, and money can be sent electronically to where it is needed the most.

Money is needed most in the Sendai area, where whole towns and villages were wiped out with tens of thousands unaccounted for.

To donate from your cellphone:

•Text ‘JAPAN’ or ‘QUAKE’ to 80888 to make a $10 donation or visit SalvationArmyUSA.org.
•Text ‘REDCROSS’ to 90999 to donate $10 to the American Red Cross.
•Text ‘MED’ to 80888 to donate $10 to Internationalmedicalcorps.org.
•Text ‘JAPAN’ to 50555 to donate $10 to Globalgiving.org
The donation will show up on your next phone bill.

To donate to the Red Cross from anywhere in the world, use this link and pick “Japan: earthquake and tsunami”

These are trustworthy organizations. Be careful of shams and scams.

If you can’t send money, please send a link to some friends.

Toyota donated 300 million yen ($3.6 million) “for relief and recovery efforts in communities affected.” Toyota is “also considering the provision of goods and services as needed.”

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